Seasonal Reminder Summer 2016

August 1, 2016

169

Sorry for the delay in the Summer reminder posts. I tend to forget the official 1st day of summer, but start remembering it once we start getting full weeks of 100 degree days. Up to that point, I continue to bask in the spring. So, summer is formally if not officially already here!   This seasonal reminder is more about making sure everything continues to work well through the stress and strain of the summer months more than anything. If you live near me, getting these things done before 10 AM in the morning is the best time of the day, otherwise you may wait till after 6 PM or so (stay hydrated; regardless).  If you need details on what to look for or what to do, click on the link (if there is one) and it will take you to the post that was written on the subject and provide more detail.

  1. Heating/Cooling-Air Filters: If you live in a dusty area and/or have been using your air conditioner a lot, inspect you filter and change it if it has noticeable build up from your spring change out.
  2. 100_0233HVAC Outdoor Unit: We did this in the spring and it’s good to do it again as vegetation has been growing through the spring months. Get your garden trimmers out and trim away any vines or growth away from the  outside condenser. You should have 18″ to 2 feet of clearance around the unit. Airborne particles generated by the blooming of trees and flowers can easily show up around the air conditioning condenser. Take your water hose and wash down the outside coils. Check the condensation drain that comes from the air handler in the house. Ensure that it is clear of obstacles or debris by pouring water through it.
  3. Water Leaks: Check all water fixtures and toilets for leaks. Inspect fixture drains for water puddles or loose joints in the traps.
  4. Water Heaters: Make a visual inspection of the water heater. Look for dripping water and rust stains. Look at the exhaust flue to ensure it is still sealed. If its time to drain the tank or replace the anode, check the link for more details.
  5. Lawn Sprinklers: Even though we performed this maintenance during the spring, yard work and vegetation growth can cause some additional sprinkler maintenance. Exercise the system (again). Look for excessive water traveling down the driveway or sidewalks. Inspect the sprinkler heads, look for blow-by, odd spray patterns, missing heads, pooling water and brown spots.  Replace or repair the heads. Chasing Lawn Sprinkler Leaks is the first of the series and covers the inspection, leak detection, repairs and tips in more detail.
  6. 100_0503Exterior Inspection:  Walk round the house, look for bird and wasp nests, as well as locations that rodents might be using to get in the house. Use caulk to re-seal  any breaches in structure that may be an entry point for rodents or bugs.  They are all looking for cool locations and possible water. If you are not opposed to using perimeter bug spray, this is a good time.
  7. Interior Inspection: Flush kitchen and bathroom sinks with scalding hot water for approximately 3-5 minutes to clear out any build up. “Water Leaks”, cover this item too.
  8. Appliances: Use a hand-held vacuum cleaner to clear the dust bunnies from around all appliances such as washers, dryers and  dish washers. Pull you refrigerator out from the wall and do the same. If it’s within your skill set, turn off the unit, pull the back cover off,  and vacuum out the condenser coils and all the dirt around the fan.
  9. 100_0206Surface Water Drainage: Gutters, culverts, waterways and landscape drainage systems should be cleared of debris and overgrowth that has occurred.
  10. Electrical Service: Inspect the Entrance, Mast and Weather-head. With tree limbs heavy with leaves, seed pods, fruits and nuts, you may have some limbs that are drooping on your electrical service lines.
  11. Electrical Service-Smoke Detectors: Clean your smoke detectors of cob webs and change the battery.
  12. Test your security system: Work with monitoring service to validate all the door, window, glass break, and motion sensors operate properly.
  1. Heating/Cooling-Air Filters: If you live in a dusty area and/or have been using your air conditioner a lot, inspect you filter and change it if it has noticeable build up from your spring change out.
  2. 100_0233HVAC Outdoor Unit: We did this in the spring and it’s good to do it again as vegetation has been growing through the spring months. Get your garden trimmers out and trim away any vines or growth away from the  outside condenser. You should have 18″ to 2 feet of clearance around the unit. Airborne particles generated by the blooming of trees and flowers can easily show up around the air conditioning condenser. Take your water hose and wash down the outside coils. Check the condensation drain that comes from the air handler in the house. Ensure that it is clear of obstacles or debris by pouring water through it.
  3. Water Leaks: Check all water fixtures and toilets for leaks. Inspect fixture drains for water puddles or loose joints in the traps.
  4. Water Heaters: Make a visual inspection of the water heater. Look for dripping water and rust stains. Look at the exhaust flue to ensure it is still sealed. If its time to drain the tank or replace the anode, check the link for more details.
  5. Lawn Sprinklers: Even though we performed this maintenance during the spring, yard work and vegetation growth can cause some additional sprinkler maintenance. Exercise the system (again). Look for excessive water traveling down the driveway or sidewalks. Inspect the sprinkler heads, look for blow-by, odd spray patterns, missing heads, pooling water and brown spots.  Replace or repair the heads. Chasing Lawn Sprinkler Leaks is the first of the series and covers the inspection, leak detection, repairs and tips in more detail.
  6. 100_0503Exterior Inspection:  Walk round the house, look for bird and wasp nests, as well as locations that rodents might be using to get in the house. Use caulk to re-seal  any breaches in structure that may be an entry point for rodents or bugs.  They are all looking for cool locations and possible water. If you are not opposed to using perimeter bug spray, this is a good time.
  7. Interior Inspection: Flush kitchen and bathroom sinks with scalding hot water for approximately 3-5 minutes to clear out any build up. “Water Leaks”, cover this item too.
  8. Appliances: Use a hand-held vacuum cleaner to clear the dust bunnies from around all appliances such as washers, dryers and  dish washers. Pull you refrigerator out from the wall and do the same. If it’s within your skill set, turn off the unit, pull the back cover off,  and vacuum out the condenser coils and all the dirt around the fan.
  9. 100_0206Surface Water Drainage: Gutters, culverts, waterways and landscape drainage systems should be cleared of debris and overgrowth that has occurred.
  10. Electrical Service: Inspect the Entrance, Mast and Weather-head. With tree limbs heavy with leaves, seed pods, fruits and nuts, you may have some limbs that are drooping on your electrical service lines.
  11. Electrical Service-Smoke Detectors: Clean your smoke detectors of cob webs and change the battery.
  12. Test your security system: Work with monitoring service to validate all the door, window, glass break, and motion sensors operate properly.
Advertisements

Water Heater Inspection

April 13, 2010

About 20 years ago, my hot water heater started leaking the day before we left for a vacation. In a panic, my wife said, what are you going to do. I said, turn it off and go to Disney World. True story!! So needless to say I had a project waiting for me when I returned. 

Water heaters come in many types, shapes and sizes. Natural gas (or LP) or electric tank type are the most common. Like everything else in the house, a little bit of maintenance and periodical inspections can work to get the most life out of a hot water heater. 

The Inspection: If the water heater is new, you can go 3 years before inspecting it. Then every two years, At 7, start inspecting it every year.

  1. How  old is the water heater? If the water heater was there before you were. You need to figure out how old it is. Newer tanks maybe clearly stamped with a date. Sometimes a plumber will also write on the tank the date of installation. If you find none of that, look for the serial number. The first four digits should include a date code. Every manufacturer does it a little different. C-93,  0393, 9303, 9313 (13 is a week number) In this example, all equate to March of 1993. Typically water heaters can last for 10-15 years, but start inspecting them more regularly at about 7 years.
  2. Physical Inspection: With a good flashlight, try to look around all the surface area of the outside structure. Look for any water, water deposits, rust or deformation in the shell of the heater Inspect all the water connections. The tank should be marked with cold input and hot output. WARNING: The hot water output will be HOT. Be careful if you touch them. Look for heavy rust and water streaks on the shell of the heater. Using a paper towel as your inspection tool it will identify water on the back side where you may not be able to see it.
  3. Cold Water Cut-off: Close the valve to make sure you can. In an emergency, you need to know it will close successfully.
  4. Pressure Release Valve: Every water heater has a pressure relief valve. By design, if the water heater gets too hot and the water starts boiling, the relief valve will let the water out. If the water heater was installed correctly, the valve should be connected to a pipe, and the pipe should exit the house.  Open the valve for about 2 seconds, then let it go quickly so it will re-seat. Be aware, it may not re-seat. If it doesn’t re-seat, activate it a couple of times. If it does not re-seat, it will need to be replaced. TIP: When testing this item, be aware, it may not re-seat, so do it when it will be convenient for you to replace it or have it replaced. You want to avoid that weekend call out to a plumber.  If you get stuck, you can turn the cold water off (see #3) and it should  stop leaking until you replace it, granted you will be limited on hot water. Here is the e-How link to replacing a pressure relief valve.
  5. Flue Inspection (Gas fired Water Heaters): You should see a rigid metal duct or flue leaving the top of the water heater. Inspect each joint to ensure it is properly sealed with aluminum type tape. This is very important as a leaky vent can cause carbon monoxide poisoning. This vent needs to be inspected from the top of the water heater to the point of exit out of the house. It should also be secure and supported on its path out of the house.

Routine Maintenance:

  1. Drain the tank of sediment: At the base of the water heater is a spigot. If you can get a bucket underneath  it, drain about a gallon of water. If it is clear, perform it yearly. If it is milky or include noticable particles. Connect a garden hose, with the open end leading outside and drain the entire tank. You must turn the water off (above item 3) and open a hot water faucet in the house so it will drain to be able to get all the water out. Perform this every 2 to 3 years.
  2. Replace the anode (optional): If your water heater does not normally last 10 years,  you may consider this maintenance item. On top of the water heater is a large bolt. Underneath the bolt is a sacrificial anode that is designed to corrode. Once it has dissolved, the tank will take on that role and start corroding.  Because we all have different water quality, the anode will corrode at different rates in different parts of the country. If you have a concern, inspect it at 5 years. It’s best to shut off the water, as well as the heat source (electricity or natural gas).  If the anode has consumed at least 6 inches, the anode should be replaced. After completing this exercise, drain and refill the tank.

Following this method will allow you to get the maximum life out of your water heater.